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Havre de Grace Gets $100K Grant For Lilly Run

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation awarded grants to four Maryland municipalities Monday.

is the recipient of a $100,000 grant to help improve Lilly Run, officials confirmed Tuesday.

The city was one of four municipalities in the state to receive funding from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, as announced Monday at a conference in Lorton, VA.

“It was a very competitive process and a lot of people put in for it and we were lucky enough to receive the $100,000,” Havre de Grace spokesman and Lilly Run project coordinator John Van Gilder told Tuesday afternoon.

The at in Havre de Grace.

The city learned recently—and it became official Monday—that it was receiving a sizeable grant.

“Lilly Run has been a problem for flooding and for public safety in Havre de Grace for the last 75 years,” Harford County Councilwoman Mary Ann Lisanti told WBAL radio Tuesday. “The stream that meanders through the town often floods during heavy rains, cutting our hospital off, from transportation to be able to get into the town. This project will allow for us to begin fixing this problem.”

Lisanti said in the WBAL interview the funding would be made available immediately.

The scope of the entire project is beyond financial means for the city, but the grant will enable Havre de Grace to begin taking some early steps towards rectifying the flooding issue while also improving the quality of the water that runs through town and into the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

"There's as much need or more need to be concerned about the quality of urban stormwater," Van Gilder said. "Working with our original contractor and a group the center for watershed protection, we looked at the original concept, and we started working toward the implementation of that plan with water quality improvements."

Part of the project involves partnerships with and Harford County Public Schools. Lilly Run cuts across most of the city, including property owned by the Havre de Grace-based , and behind Havre de Grace High School’s .

"We're working very closely with those guys. The design is to build in an environmental education component, a small habitat," Van Gilder said. "We want it, really when it's all said and done, to be a showcase project. There will be a lot of recreational trails."

Havre de Grace has , helping to aid Maryland in .

The $100,000 grant will assist in cleansing the runoff from the city's largest stormwater discharge into the bay, Van Gilder said.

He said the short-term project will focus on a stretch of Lilly Run from Revolution Street to the Amtrak overpass near .

The other municipalities to receive grant funding include Cambridge, Easton and Prince George's County.

Stay with Patch for updates on the Lilly Run project.

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DreDre July 11, 2012 at 12:56 PM
Thank God! My family and I live on Lily Run and are always fearfull of flooding. I know this will be a great help to those that live behind us who get flooded out everytime it rains hard...
Curtis Coon July 11, 2012 at 06:09 PM
This is great news! It speaks well of our grant-catching ability, and seemingly, will fold in to the plans to build a new High School in the Lilly Run Area. Congratulations to all those who worked hard to make it happen!!
Tom Fitzpatrick July 12, 2012 at 11:37 AM
Fantastic news. By repackaging the Lilly Run project as a stream restoration project, we've been able to take solving the Lilly Run challenge well beyond simple flood control, and open up opportunities for us to attract the funding we'll need to get this job done.
Biller's Bikes July 12, 2012 at 01:54 PM
When the East Coast Greenway Alliance designated an interim route through HdG in April 2006 it projected that a bike/hike trail would be finished from near Harris Field to the HdG Activity Center, some of that by Lilly Creek. The attractive Greenway trail signage eagerly awaits this little trail's advancement. The Maine-to-Florida Greenway route then crosses RT40 through the neighborhoods on its way to Monkton and the NCR Trail, Baltimore, DC, and eventually the southernmost Florida Keys.
Kathleen O'Brien July 16, 2012 at 03:41 PM
Was not Mr. Clark Turner given enormous tax breaks - in the millions - from the city - to 'redo' and 'fix' the flooding of Lily Run for his old neighborhood? Had not he publicly promised all the 'old women' in his old neighborhood that he would do so for them? Isn't that why 'the ladies' had supported him in his endeavor of tearing down all the 'ghetto' around that area of Bloomsbury? Wasn't tearing down 'the ghetto' the main reason for Mr. Turner's project in Bloomsbury - to build new luxury condominiums? Or am I mistaken? Wasn't he given millions of tax benefits for this project and for the entire Bulle Rock complex? As this is what I recall, I am just asking. If this is true, is not the onus to support the new Lily Run Stream Restoration Project - with a continuing substantial monetary investment on Mr. Turner's part - is this not required for him to do so? If I am mistaken, please correct me. If I am wrong, please correctly provide all the information that states otherwise. Thank you.
Sean Welsh July 16, 2012 at 03:52 PM
Kathleen — The last report we did on the area—known as "Tranquility Place"—indicated Mr. Turner was no longer involved with the project. You can find that report here: http://havredegrace.patch.com/articles/will-this-place-always-remain-so-tranquil I may have to do some follow-up stories on that end of the Lilly Run project as we dig into the latest news. I'll have another post on Lilly Run by tomorrow. Thanks, Sean
Kathleen O'Brien July 17, 2012 at 09:46 PM
Sean - Thank you! I will read this report after dinner. But my big question or thoughts are as follows from your reply here - how could Mr. Turner become "no longer involved with the project" if he had such a great amount free tax money from the city? Isn't that wrong? A dereliction of duty, so to speak? If he was given these tax breaks, doesn't that demand an obligation on his part to complete the original terms that these tax breaks were allowed? How does that affect our city's coffers? I'm concerned for the ethics involved in all of this project and Mr. Turner's requirements by law. I am thrilled we received a grant to fix this flooding. Woo hoo! But I am deeply concerned about promises made to not only the city, but its citizens, too. I am very uneasy with the lack of follow through with Mr. Turner's promises & contracts with us, and why he was excused from this particular promise. Again, thank you.
Fred Cullum July 18, 2012 at 02:01 AM
There were no tax breaks given. The proposal was for the developer to provide a partial diversion of Lily Run through the tranquility property when it was redeveloped. The diversion project would have been paid for thru a bond issue and the bonds would have been paid using some of the increased tax revenue derived from the increased property values in tranquility. There were 240 dwelling units removed and the proposal was for about 300 single family homes. That proposal no longer is being considered by the property owners. The $100,000 grant is only a fraction of what is needed to ease the flooding problem from Lily Run, but it is a start.
Richard Beam February 09, 2013 at 04:40 AM
Ok, it is now 2/2013 There has been no progress in this. I haven't seen nothing done yet. The city of HdG is taking on a bunch of big money projects and I have yet to see progress of any kind! If I loose my house in one of these floods I promise I will not go away quietly!

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